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Birth Control

Clinical Trials  |  Add a link  |  Regulations  |  Discussion Board  |  Ask the Nurse | Last Update January 1st. 2009  |  About FDA.COM  | Media Kit

Also called: Contraception
Birth control, also known as contraception, is designed to prevent pregnancy. Birth control methods may work in a number of different ways. These include
Preventing sperm from getting to the eggs - condoms, diaphragms and intrauterine devices (IUDs) work this way
Keeping the woman's ovaries from releasing eggs that could be fertilized - birth control pills work this way
Sterilization, which permanently prevents a woman from getting pregnant or a man from being able to get a woman pregnant
Your choice of birth control should depend on several factors. These include your health, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners and desire to have children in the future. Your health care provider can help you select the best form of birth control for you.


Contraception

What is contraception?
Contraception, also known as birth control, is designed to prevent pregnancy.


What are some methods of contraception?
There are several general methods of birth control, including (but not limited to):
Barrier methods, such as condoms, the diaphragm, and the cervical cap, designed to prevent the sperm from entering the uterus.
Intrauterine device, or IUD, is a small device that is inserted into the uterus by a health care provider. The IUD is more than 99 percent effective at preventing pregnancy. An IUD can stay in the uterus for up to 10 years until it is removed by a health care provider.
Hormonal birth control, such as birth control pills, injections, skin patches, vaginal rings, and implants release hormones into a woman’s body that interfere with fertility by preventing ovulation.
Sterilization is a method that permanently prevents a woman from getting pregnant or a man from being able to get a woman pregnant. Sterilization involves surgical procedures that must be done by a health care provider and usually cannot be reversed.
The choice of birth control depends on factors such as a person's overall health, age, frequency of sexual activity, number of sexual partners, desire to have children in the future, and family history of certain diseases. A woman should talk to her health care provider about her choice of birth control method.
It is important to remember that even though all these methods can prevent pregnancy, condoms are the only method that can protect against sexually transmitted diseases or HIV.
 

 

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