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Crohn's and Colitis

Clinical Trials  |  Add a link  |  Regulations  |  Discussion Board  |  Ask the Nurse | Last Update January 1st. 2009  |  About FDA.COM  | Media Kit

 

What is Crohn’s disease?

Crohn’s disease is an ongoing disorder that causes inflammation of the digestive tract, also referred to as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Crohn’s disease can affect any area of the GI tract, from the mouth to the anus, but it most commonly affects the lower part of the small intestine, called the ileum. The swelling extends deep into the lining of the affected organ. The swelling can cause pain and can make the intestines empty frequently, resulting in diarrhea.

Image of the digestive track.
The digestive system.

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease, the general name for diseases that cause swelling in the intestines. Because the symptoms of Crohn’s disease are similar to other intestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis, it can be difficult to diagnose. Ulcerative colitis causes inflammation and ulcers in the top layer of the lining of the large intestine. In Crohn’s disease, all layers of the intestine may be involved, and normal healthy bowel can be found between sections of diseased bowel.

Crohn’s disease affects men and women equally and seems to run in some families. About 20 percent of people with Crohn’s disease have a blood relative with some form of inflammatory bowel disease, most often a brother or sister and sometimes a parent or child. Crohn’s disease can occur in people of all age groups, but it is more often diagnosed in people between the ages of 20 and 30. People of Jewish heritage have an increased risk of developing Crohn’s disease, and African Americans are at decreased risk for developing Crohn’s disease.

Crohn’s disease may also be called ileitis or enteritis.

 

What causes Crohn’s disease?

Several theories exist about what causes Crohn’s disease, but none have been proven. The human immune system is made from cells and different proteins that protect people from infection. The most popular theory is that the body’s immune system reacts abnormally in people with Crohn’s disease, mistaking bacteria, foods, and other substances for being foreign. The immune system’s response is to attack these “invaders.” During this process, white blood cells accumulate in the lining of the intestines, producing chronic inflammation, which leads to ulcerations and bowel injury.

Scientists do not know if the abnormality in the functioning of the immune system in people with Crohn’s disease is a cause, or a result, of the disease. Research shows that the inflammation seen in the GI tract of people with Crohn’s disease involves several factors: the genes the patient has inherited, the immune system itself, and the environment. Foreign substances, also referred to as antigens, are found in the environment. One possible cause for inflammation may be the body’s reaction to these antigens, or that the antigens themselves are the cause for the inflammation. Some scientists think that a protein produced by the immune system, called anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF), may be a possible cause for the inflammation associated with Crohn’s disease.

 

What are the symptoms?

The most common symptoms of Crohn’s disease are abdominal pain, often in the lower right area, and diarrhea. Rectal bleeding, weight loss, arthritis, skin problems, and fever may also occur. Bleeding may be serious and persistent, leading to anemia. Children with Crohn’s disease may suffer delayed development and stunted growth. The range and severity of symptoms varies.

 

How is Crohn’s disease diagnosed?

A thorough physical exam and a series of tests may be required to diagnose Crohn’s disease.

Blood tests may be done to check for anemia, which could indicate bleeding in the intestines. Blood tests may also uncover a high white blood cell count, which is a sign of inflammation somewhere in the body. By testing a stool sample, the doctor can tell if there is bleeding or infection in the intestines.

The doctor may do an upper GI series to look at the small intestine. For this test, the person drinks barium, a chalky solution that coats the lining of the small intestine, before x rays are taken. The barium shows up white on x-ray film, revealing inflammation or other abnormalities in the intestine. If these tests show Crohn’s disease, more x rays of both the upper and lower digestive tract may be necessary to see how much of the GI tract is affected by the disease.

The doctor may also do a visual exam of the colon by performing either a sigmoidoscopy or a colonoscopy. For both of these tests, the doctor inserts a long, flexible, lighted tube linked to a computer and TV monitor into the anus. A sigmoidoscopy allows the doctor to examine the lining of the lower part of the large intestine, while a colonoscopy allows the doctor to examine the lining of the entire large intestine. The doctor will be able to see any inflammation or bleeding during either of these exams, although a colonoscopy is usually a better test because the doctor can see the entire large intestine. The doctor may also do a biopsy, which involves taking a sample of tissue from the lining of the intestine to view with a microscope.

 

What are the complications of Crohn’s disease?

The most common complication is blockage of the intestine. Blockage occurs because the disease tends to thicken the intestinal wall with swelling and scar tissue, narrowing the passage. Crohn’s disease may also cause sores, or ulcers, that tunnel through the affected area into surrounding tissues, such as the bladder, vagina, or skin. The areas around the anus and rectum are often involved. The tunnels, called fistulas, are a common complication and often become infected. Sometimes fistulas can be treated with medicine, but in some cases they may require surgery. In addition to fistulas, small tears called fissures may develop in the lining of the mucus membrane of the anus.

Nutritional complications are common in Crohn’s disease. Deficiencies of proteins, calories, and vitamins are well documented. These deficiencies may be caused by inadequate dietary intake, intestinal loss of protein, or poor absorption, also referred to as malabsorption.

Other complications associated with Crohn’s disease include arthritis, skin problems, inflammation in the eyes or mouth, kidney stones, gallstones, or other diseases of the liver and biliary system. Some of these problems resolve during treatment for disease in the digestive system, but some must be treated separately.

 

What is the treatment for Crohn’s disease?

Treatment may include drugs, nutrition supplements, surgery, or a combination of these options. The goals of treatment are to control inflammation, correct nutritional deficiencies, and relieve symptoms like abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding. At this time, treatment can help control the disease by lowering the number of times a person experiences a recurrence, but there is no cure. Treatment for Crohn’s disease depends on the location and severity of disease, complications, and the person’s response to previous medical treatments when treated for reoccurring symptoms.

Some people have long periods of remission, sometimes years, when they are free of symptoms. However, the disease usually recurs at various times over a person’s lifetime. This changing pattern of the disease means one cannot always tell when a treatment has helped. Predicting when a remission may occur or when symptoms will return is not possible.

Someone with Crohn’s disease may need medical care for a long time, with regular doctor visits to monitor the condition.

Drug Therapy

Anti-Inflammation Drugs. Most people are first treated with drugs containing mesalamine, a substance that helps control inflammation. Sulfasalazine is the most commonly used of these drugs. Patients who do not benefit from it or who cannot tolerate it may be put on other mesalamine-containing drugs, generally known as 5-ASA agents, such as Asacol, Dipentum, or Pentasa. Possible side effects of mesalamine-containing drugs include nausea, vomiting, heartburn, diarrhea, and headache.

Cortisone or Steroids. Cortisone drugs and steroids—called corticosteriods—provide very effective results. Prednisone is a common generic name of one of the drugs in this group of medications. In the beginning, when the disease it at its worst, prednisone is usually prescribed in a large dose. The dosage is then lowered once symptoms have been controlled. These drugs can cause serious side effects, including greater susceptibility to infection.

Immune System Suppressors. Drugs that suppress the immune system are also used to treat Crohn’s disease. Most commonly prescribed are 6-mercaptopurine or a related drug, azathioprine. Immunosuppressive agents work by blocking the immune reaction that contributes to inflammation. These drugs may cause side effects like nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea and may lower a person’s resistance to infection. When patients are treated with a combination of corticosteroids and immunosuppressive drugs, the dose of corticosteroids may eventually be lowered. Some studies suggest that immunosuppressive drugs may enhance the effectiveness of corticosteroids.

Infliximab (Remicade). This drug is the first of a group of medications that blocks the body’s inflammation response. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug for the treatment of moderate to severe Crohn’s disease that does not respond to standard therapies (mesalamine substances, corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents) and for the treatment of open, draining fistulas. Infliximab, the first treatment approved specifically for Crohn’s disease is a TNF substance. Additional research will need to be done in order to fully understand the range of treatments Remicade may offer to help people with Crohn’s disease.

Antibiotics. Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine caused by stricture, fistulas, or prior surgery. For this common problem, the doctor may prescribe one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, sulfonamide, cephalosporin, tetracycline, or metronidazole.

Anti-Diarrheal and Fluid Replacements. Diarrhea and crampy abdominal pain are often relieved when the inflammation subsides, but additional medication may also be necessary. Several antidiarrheal agents could be used, including diphenoxylate, loperamide, and codeine. Patients who are dehydrated because of diarrhea will be treated with fluids and electrolytes.

Nutrition Supplementation

The doctor may recommend nutritional supplements, especially for children whose growth has been slowed. Special high-calorie liquid formulas are sometimes used for this purpose. A small number of patients may need to be fed intravenously for a brief time through a small tube inserted into the vein of the arm. This procedure can help patients who need extra nutrition temporarily, those whose intestines need to rest, or those whose intestines cannot absorb enough nutrition from food. There are no known foods that cause Crohn’s disease. However, when people are suffering a flare in disease, foods such as bulky grains, hot spices, alcohol, and milk products may increase diarrhea and cramping.

Surgery

Two-thirds to three-quarters of patients with Crohn’s disease will require surgery at some point in their lives. Surgery becomes necessary when medications can no longer control symptoms. Surgery is used either to relieve symptoms that do not respond to medical therapy or to correct complications such as blockage, perforation, abscess, or bleeding in the intestine. Surgery to remove part of the intestine can help people with Crohn’s disease, but it is not a cure. Surgery does not eliminate the disease, and it is not uncommon for people with Crohn’s Disease to have more than one operation, as inflammation tends to return to the area next to where the diseased intestine was removed.

Some people who have Crohn’s disease in the large intestine need to have their entire colon removed in an operation called a colectomy. A small opening is made in the front of the abdominal wall, and the tip of the ileum, which is located at the end of the small intestine, is brought to the skin’s surface. This opening, called a stoma, is where waste exits the body. The stoma is about the size of a quarter and is usually located in the right lower part of the abdomen near the beltline. A pouch is worn over the opening to collect waste, and the patient empties the pouch as needed. The majority of colectomy patients go on to live normal, active lives.

Sometimes only the diseased section of intestine is removed and no stoma is needed. In this operation, the intestine is cut above and below the diseased area and reconnected.

Because Crohn’s disease often recurs after surgery, people considering it should carefully weigh its benefits and risks compared with other treatments. Surgery may not be appropriate for everyone. People faced with this decision should get as much information as possible from doctors, nurses who work with colon surgery patients (enterostomal therapists), and other patients. Patient advocacy organizations can suggest support groups and other information resources. (See For More Information for the names of such organizations.)

People with Crohn’s disease may feel well and be free of symptoms for substantial spans of time when their disease is not active. Despite the need to take medication for long periods of time and occasional hospitalizations, most people with Crohn’s disease are able to hold jobs, raise families, and function successfully at home and in society.

 

Can diet control Crohn’s disease?

People with Crohn’s disease often experience a decrease in appetite, which can affect their ability to receive the daily nutrition needed for good health and healing. In addition, Crohn’s disease is associated with diarrhea and poor absorption of necessary nutrients. No special diet has been proven effective for preventing or treating Crohn’s disease, but it is very important that people who have Crohn’s disease follow a nutritious diet and avoid any foods that seem to worsen symptoms. There are no consistent dietary rules to follow that will improve a person’s symptoms.

People should take vitamin supplements only on their doctor’s advice.

 

Can stress make Crohn’s disease worse?

There is no evidence showing that stress causes Crohn’s disease. However, people with Crohn’s disease sometimes feel increased stress in their lives from having to live with a chronic illness. Some people with Crohn’s disease also report that they experience a flare in disease when they are experiencing a stressful event or situation. There is no type of person that is more likely to experience a flare in disease than another when under stress. For people who find there is a connection between their stress level and a worsening of their symptoms, using relaxation techniques, such as slow breathing, and taking special care to eat well and get enough sleep, may help them feel better.

 

Is pregnancy safe for women with Crohn’s disease?

Research has shown that the course of pregnancy and delivery is usually not impaired in women with Crohn’s disease. Even so, women with Crohn’s disease should discuss the matter with their doctors before pregnancy. Most children born to women with Crohn’s disease are unaffected. Children who do get the disease are sometimes more severely affected than adults, with slowed growth and delayed sexual development in some cases.

 

Hope through Research

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) conducts and supports research into many kinds of digestive disorders, including Crohn’s disease. Several clinical trials are currently evaluating the efficacy and safety of different therapies for the treatment of Crohn’s disease. For a complete listing of trials being conducted, visit www.clinicaltrials.gov.
 

NOTE: The U.S. Government does not endorse or favor any specific commercial product or company. Trade, proprietary, or company names appearing in this document are used only because they are considered necessary in the context of the information provided. If a product is not mentioned, the omission does not mean or imply that the product is unsatisfactory.

For More Information

Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America
386 Park Avenue South, 17th Floor
New York, NY 10016–8804
Phone: 1–800–932–2423 or 212–685–3440
Email: info@ccfa.org
Internet: www.ccfa.org

Reach Out for Youth with Ileitis and Colitis, Inc.
84 Northgate Circle
Melville, NY 11747
Phone: Phone: 631–293–3102
Email: reachoutforyouth@reachoutforyouth.org
Internet: www.reachoutforyouth.org

United Ostomy Association, Inc.
19772 MacArthur Blvd #200
Irvine, CA 92612–2405
Phone: 1–800–826–0826 or 949–660–8624
Fax: 949–660–9262
Email: uoa@deltanet.com
Internet: www.uoa.org

 


National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse

2 Information Way
Bethesda, MD 20892–3570
Phone: 1–800–891–5389
TTY: 1–866–569–1162
Fax: 703–738–4929
Email: nddic@info.niddk.nih.gov
Internet: www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1980, the Clearinghouse provides information about digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. The NDDIC answers inquiries, develops and distributes publications, and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about digestive diseases.

Publications produced by the Clearinghouse are carefully reviewed by both NIDDK scientists and outside experts. This publication was originally reviewed by the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America.

This publication is not copyrighted. The Clearinghouse encourages users of this publication to duplicate and distribute as many copies as desired.

 

 

Reference Links - Add a link

Clinical Trials - Add a clinical trial

 top
1
Recruiting
Crohn’s Disease, Obesity and Disease Severity
Condition:
Crohn’s Disease, Obesity 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
2
Recruiting
Induction of Clinical Response Using Rifaximin in Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: Placebo Comparator;   Drug: Rifaximin 
 
 

 
3
Not yet recruiting
Capsule Endoscopy Crohn's Disease Activity Index - Validation Multi Center Study
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Device: Capsule endoscopy 
 
 

 
4
Recruiting
Use of FDG PET/CT to Evaluate Crohn Disease
Condition:
Crohn Disease 
Intervention:
Procedure: FDG PET/CT 
 
 

 
5
Recruiting
Imuran (Azathioprine) Dose-Ranging Study in Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: azathioprine 
 
 

 
6
Recruiting
The Efficacy of Low Dose Naltrexone Therapy in Children With Crohn's Disease
Conditions:
Gastrointestinal Diseases;   Crohn's Disease;   Inflammatory Bowel Diseases;   Gastroenteritis;   Intestinal Diseases;   Inflammation;   Digestive System Diseases 
Interventions:
Drug: Naltrexone;   Drug: Placebo and Naltrexone 
 
 

 
7
Recruiting
Treatment of Crohn's Disease With an Antibiotic Regimen Directed Against Mycobacterium Avium Paratuberculosis
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: Rifabutin, Clarithromycin, and Clofazimine 
 
 

 
8
Recruiting
Prochymal[TM] to Treat Crohn's Disease
Conditions:
Colitis;   Crohn's Disease;   Inflammatory Bowel Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: PROCHYMAL;   Drug: Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC);   Procedure: Colonoscopy;   Procedure: Infusion 
 
 

 
9
Not yet recruiting
Pilot Comparative Bioavailability Study of 6Mercaptopurine (Delayed Release vs. Purinethol) in Crohns Disease Patients
Condition:
Crohns Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: Delayed Release 6 mercaptopurine;   Drug: 6 Mercaptopurine 
 
 

 
10
Recruiting
Placebo Controlled Study of 3 Doses of Rifaximin-EIR Tablet to Treat Moderate, Active Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: Rifaximin-EIR 
 
 

 
11
Recruiting
A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Certolizumab Pegol for Induction of Remission in Patients With Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn Disease 
Interventions:
Biological: certolizumab pegol (CDP870);   Other: Placebo 
 
 

 
12
Recruiting
Protein and Energy Metabolism in Pediatric Crohn's Disease
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Protein Metabolism;   Energy Metabolism 
Intervention:
Other: Stable isotope infusions 
 
 

 
13
Recruiting
Dietary Treatment of Crohn's Disease
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Inflammatory Bowel Disease 
Interventions:
Dietary Supplement: Time and attention + fructooligosaccharide placebo;   Dietary Supplement: dietary therapy + fructooligosaccharide placebo;   Dietary Supplement: Time and attention + active fructooligosaccharide supplementation 
 
 

 
14
Recruiting
Clarithromycin in Active Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: Clarithromycin 
 
 

 
15
Not yet recruiting
A Double Blind Placebo Control Study to Assess the Safety,Tolerability and Efficacy of Copaxone in Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohns Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: glatiramer acetate;   Drug: placebo 
 
 

 
16
Recruiting
Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Biological: autologous CD34-selected peripheral blood stem cells transplant 
 
 

 
17
Recruiting
 

 
18
Recruiting
Efficacy, Safety and Tolerability of AIN457 in Moderate to Severe Active Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: AIN457;   Drug: Placebo 
 
 

 
19
Recruiting
VSL#3 Versus Placebo in Maintenance of Remission in Crohn’s Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: VSL#3 
 
 

 
20
Recruiting
Immune Regulation in Ulcerative Colitis or Crohn's Disease
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Inflammatory Bowel Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
21
Recruiting
Safety of Celecoxib in Patients With Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: Celebrex;   Drug: placebo 
 
 

 
22
Recruiting
A Study of Abatacept in Patients With Active Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: abatacept;   Drug: placebo 
 
 

 
23
Recruiting
Pravastatin Therapy in Patients With Active Crohn's Disease: A Pilot Study
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: Pravastatin 
 
 

 
24
Recruiting
Endoscopic Severity Score of Small Bowel Crohn's Disease With Wireless Capsule Endoscopy
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Device: wireless endoscopy capsule;   Device: patency agile 
 
 

 
25
Recruiting
 

 
26
Recruiting
The Effects of Naltrexone on Active Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Inflammation 
Interventions:
Drug: Naltrexone;   Drug: Placebo 
 
 

 
27
Not yet recruiting
Effect of Increlex® on Children With Crohn Disease
Condition:
Crohn Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: rhIGF (Increlex) 
 
 

 
28
Recruiting
Synbiotic Treatment in Crohn's Disease Patients
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: Synbiotic (Synergy I / B.longum) 
 
 

 
29
Recruiting
Crohn's Disease Stem Cell Transplantation
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Procedure: stem cell transplantation 
 
 

 
 
31
Recruiting
Early Immunosuppressants in Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: early immunosuppressants (azathioprine, methotrexate) 
 
 

 
32
Recruiting
Adalimumab in Combination With Ciprofloxacin/Placebo Treatment of Perianal Fistulas in Crohn's
Condition:
Crohn's Disease With Perianal Fistulas 
Interventions:
Drug: adalimumab;   Drug: ciprofloxacin 
 
 

 
33
Recruiting
Adverse Effects of Glucocorticoid Therapy on Bone in Childhood Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: prednisolone;   Dietary Supplement: Alicalm (polymeric liquid formula) 
 
 

 
34
Recruiting
ASTIC Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Crohn’s Disease
Condition:
Crohn Disease 
Intervention:
Procedure: Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplant 
 
 

 
35
Recruiting
Treatment of Crohn's Fistula Using a Porcine Intestine Submucosa Graft (Surgisis AFP)
Conditions:
Anal Fistula;   Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Device: Surgisis Biodesign Anal Fistula Plug (Surgisis AFP) 
 
 

 
36
Recruiting
Safety and Immunogenicity of a TNFa Kinoid in Patients With Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Biological: TNFa Kinoid 
 
 

 
37
Not yet recruiting
Adjuvant Vitamin D With Corticosteroids in Active Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: Colecalciferol D3 (Vigantol Oil);   Drug: Medium chain triglycerides 
 
 

 
38
Recruiting
Beta Carotene From Natural Source for Patients With Non-Active Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: beta carotene from Dunaliella algae 
 
 

 
 
40
Recruiting
Urinary Prostaglandin E Metabolite (PGE-M), A Metabolite of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2): A Novel Biomarker of Crohn's Disease Activity
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Procedure: Fecal calprotectin;   Procedure: Urinary PGE-M Level 
 
 

 
41
Recruiting
Levels of the Stat4 Alpha and Stat4 Beta Isoforms in PBMCs From Patients With Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis
Conditions:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease;   Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Intervention:
Other: measurement of inflammatory markers 
 
 

 
42
Recruiting
Dose Ranging Study Comparing the Efficacy, Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Intravenous Infusions of ABT-874 vs Placebo in Subjects With Active Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Biological: Placebo;   Biological: ABT-874;   Biological: ABT-874 
 
 

 
43
Recruiting
Evaluation of PROCHYMAL[tm] Adult Human Stem Cells for Treatment-Resistant Moderate-to-Severe Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: adult human mesenchymal stem cells;   Drug: Placebo 
 
 

 
44
Recruiting
Phase 1 Study of Safety and Biological Effects of C326, an Inhibitor of IL-6, in Crohn’s Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: C326, IL-6 Inhibitory Avimer protein 
 
 

 
45
Recruiting
Comparison of a Nutritional Anti-Inflammatory Treatment to Steroids for Pediatric Crohn's Disease - the Molecular Basis
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Pediatric 
Interventions:
Drug: MODULEN IBD (R) (specific Enteral Nutrition);   Drug: prednisolon 
 
 

 
46
Recruiting
A Study to Investigate the Safety and Efficacy of CP-690,550 in Patients With Moderate to Severe Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: CP-690,550;   Drug: CP-690,550;   Drug: CP-690,550 
 
 

 
47
Recruiting
Protein Metabolism in Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis;   Protein Metabolism 
Intervention:
Other: stable isotope infusions 
 
 

 
48
Not yet recruiting
 

 
49
Not yet recruiting
Vitamin D Supplementation in Crohn's Patients
Condition:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease 
Intervention:
Dietary Supplement: Vitamin D 
 
 

 
50
Recruiting
Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) Guided Treatment With Humira for Crohn's Perianal Fistulas
Conditions:
Crohn Disease;   Rectal Fistula 
Interventions:
Procedure: Rectal Endoscopic Ultrasound(EUS);   Procedure: Rectal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) 
 
 
51
Recruiting
Evaluation of Intestinal Secretion of Antibodies and Auto-Antibodies Associated With Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Other: Blood sampling and biopsy;   Other: Biopsy and blood sampling;   Other: Biopsy and blood sampling 
 
 

 
52
Recruiting
Infliximab to Treat Crohn's-Like Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Chronic Granulomatous Disease
Conditions:
Chronic Granulomatous Disease;   Crohn's-Like IBD;   Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) 
Intervention:
Drug: Infliximab 
 
 

 
53
Not yet recruiting
Development of Workshop for Lifestyle Changing for Crohn's Disease Patients and Its Affect on the Disease's Indexes
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Behavioral: lifestyle changing workshop 
 
 

 
54
Recruiting
Genetic Markers as Predictors of Phenotypes in Pediatric Onset Crohn's Disease
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis;   Inflammatory Bowel Disease 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
55
Recruiting
Epidemiology of Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease in Non Jewish Israel Population
Conditions:
Ulcerative Colitis;   Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
56
Recruiting
Evaluation of PET CT in the Management of Patients With Crohn's Disease.
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Radiation: FDG PET CT 
 
 

 
57
Not yet recruiting
Immunological Consequences of CARD15/NOD2 Mutations in Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Other: intestinal biopsies 
 
 

 
58
Recruiting
Immune Ablation and Stem Cell Support for Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn Disease 
Intervention:
Procedure: Stem Cell Transplant 
 
 

 
59
Recruiting
Bone Health in Pediatric Crohn's Disease: A Low Magnitude Mechanical Stimulus Trial
Condition:
Crohn Disease 
Interventions:
Device: Low magnitude mechanical stimulus;   Device: Placebo (inactive) low magnitude mechanical stimulus 
 
 

 
60
Recruiting
Treatment of Perianal Crohn's Disease, Combining Medical and Surgical Treatment.
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: Infliximab;   Procedure: Instillation of fibrin glue 
 
 

 
61
Recruiting
Program Extension of Real Life Dosing of Remicade in Austria for Crohn's Disease (Study P04052)
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Biological: Infliximab 
 
 

 
62
Recruiting
Efficacy and Safety of Adalimumab in Pediatric Subjects With Moderate to Severe Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Biological: adalimumab;   Biological: adalimumab;   Biological: adalimumab 
 
 

 
63
Recruiting
Growth Hormone in Children With Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) and With Crohn's Disease
Conditions:
Arthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid;   Crohn Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: somatropin [rDNA origin] for injection 
 
 

 
64
Not yet recruiting
VSL#3 Treatment in Children With Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Dietary Supplement: VSL#3;   Dietary Supplement: Placebo 
 
 

 
65
Recruiting
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Support in Patients With Severe Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Procedure: Immune Ablation and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Support 
 
 

 
66
Not yet recruiting
Laquinimod Phase IIa Study in Active Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: Laquinimod;   Drug: placebo 
 
 

 
67
Recruiting
Ciprofloxacin for the Prevention of Postoperative Endoscopic Recurrence in Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: Ciprofloxacin;   Drug: Placebo 
 
 

 
68
Recruiting
Growth Relapse and Outcomes With Therapy 1
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Pediatric Onset 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
69
Recruiting
Impact of Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Antibodies on the T-Lymphocyte and Macrophage Cooperation in the Crohn Disease
Condition:
Crohn Disease 
Intervention:
Procedure: rectosigmoïdal biopsies 
 
 

 
70
Recruiting
 

 
71
Recruiting
Study of Vedolizumab (MLN0002) in Patients With Moderate to Severe Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: vedolizumab;   Other: Placebo 
 
 

 
72
Not yet recruiting
An Open-Label Study of Vedolizumab (MLN0002) in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease
Conditions:
Ulcerative Colitis;   Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: vedolizumab 
 
 

 
73
Not yet recruiting
The Effect on Mucosal Healing With Pentasa Sachet in Mild to Moderate Active "Drug: Crohn's Disease"
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: Mesalazine (Mesalamine) 
 
 

 
74
Recruiting
Effect of Iron and Vitamin E Supplementation on Disease Activity in Patients With Either Crohn's Disease or Ulcerative Colitis
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis;   Mild or Moderate Anaemia 
Interventions:
Drug: Iron supplement 300-600 mg/day;   Drug: Vitamin E 800IU 
 
 

 
75
Recruiting
Extended Evaluation of PROCHYMAL[tm] Adult Human Stem Cells for Treatment-Resistant Moderate-to-Severe Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: adult human mesenchymal stem cells;   Drug: adult human mesenchymal stem cells 
 
 

 
76
Recruiting
Thalidomide in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.
Conditions:
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases;   Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Interventions:
Drug: Thalidomide;   Drug: placebo 
 
 

 
77
Recruiting
Phase II Study of HMPL-004 in Subjects With Crohn's Disease
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Drug: HMPL004;   Drug: Placebo 
 
 

 
78
Recruiting
 

 
79
Recruiting
Managing Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Conditions:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease;   Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Interventions:
Behavioral: SLCBT;   Behavioral: ES 
 
 

 
80
Recruiting
CD INFORM: Investigating Natalizumab Through Further Observational Research and Monitoring
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: Natalizumab 
 
 

 
81
Recruiting
Vitamin D Levels in Children With IBD
Conditions:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease;   Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Interventions:
Dietary Supplement: ergocalciferol;   Dietary Supplement: Cholecalciferol 
 
 

 
82
Recruiting
Evaluation of Urinary Isoprostanes in the Assessment of Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Conditions:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis;   Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
83
Recruiting
An Assessment of Goal-Directed Intraoperative Fluid Management in Hand Assisted Laparoscopic Colectomy
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis;   Rectal Cancer;   Colon Cancer;   Colon Polyps;   Rectal Polyps;   Diverticulitis 
Interventions:
Drug: Hextend;   Drug: Lactated Ringers 
 
 

 
84
Recruiting
Use of Symbiotics to Reduce Urinary Oxalate Excretion
Conditions:
Enteric Hyperoxaluria;   Crohn's Disease;   Gastric Bypass 
Interventions:
Drug: Oxadrop/Placebo;   Drug: AKSB/Placebo;   Other: Placebo/Placebo 
 
 

 
85
Recruiting
Cost-Effectiveness of TPMT Pharmacogenetics
Conditions:
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases;   Crohn Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Interventions:
Genetic: TPMT genotyping; Drug: azathioprine or 6-mercaptopurine;   Drug: azathioprine (AZA) or 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) 
 
 

 
86
Recruiting
Study Registry to Evaluate the Long-Term Safety of Infliximab and Clinical Status of Pediatric Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis;   Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
87
Recruiting
Prevalence of Cytomegalovirus, Epstein Barr Virus and Human Herpes 6 Virus in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
88
Not yet recruiting
Study of Tysabri (Natalizumab) in Patients Who Failed Anti-TNF-α Therapy
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: TYSABRI (natalizumab) 
 
 

 
89
Recruiting
Centocor Microarry Study of Patients
Conditions:
Rheumatoid Arthritis;   Psoriatic Arthritis;   Psoriasis;   Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: Infliximab 
 
 

 
90
Recruiting
The Innate Immune System and Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Conditions:
Ulcerative Colitis;   Crohn's Disease;   Healthy Controls 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
91
Recruiting
Understanding and Treating Neuropsychiatric Symptoms of Pediatric Physical Illness
Conditions:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis;   Crohn's Disease;   Depression 
Interventions:
Behavioral: Primary and Secondary Coping Enhancement Training;   Behavioral: Supportive Non-directive Therapy 
 
 

 
92
Not yet recruiting
Treatment With Infliximab in a Medical Setting (Study P05587)
Condition:
Crohn's Disease 
Interventions:
Biological: Infliximab;   Biological: Infliximab 
 
 

 
93
Recruiting
Non-Invasive Imaging of GI Inflammation Using Microbubble Contrast Enhanced Ultrasonography
Condition:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease 
Interventions:
Other: Definity;   Other: Definity 
 
 

 
94
Recruiting
MICI-CMV:Valganciclovir in Recurrent Bouts of Cryptogenic Inflammatory Bowel Diseases With an Infection by Cytomegalovirus
Conditions:
Cytomegalovirus Infections;   Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 
Intervention:
Drug: Valganciclovir 
 
 

 
95
Recruiting
Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Reducing Depressive Symptoms in Physically Ill Youth
Conditions:
Depression;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Interventions:
Behavioral: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD);   Behavioral: Supportive nondirective therapy (SNDT) 
 
 

 
96
Recruiting
Reducing Depressive Symptoms in Physically Ill Youth
Conditions:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease;   Subsyndromal Depression 
Interventions:
Behavioral: Primary and Secondary Coping Enhancement Training (PASCET);   Behavioral: Supportive Non-directive Therapy (SNDT) 
 
 

 
97
Recruiting
Remicade Infusion Management Program (Study P04466)
Conditions:
Crohn Disease;   Rheumatoid Arthritis 
Intervention:
Biological: Infliximab 
 
 

 
98
Recruiting
Early Alimentation Following Colorectal Surgery
Conditions:
Colorectal Neoplasms;   Crohn Disease 
Intervention:
Behavioral: Oral alimentation started 12 hours after colorectal surgery 
 
 

 
99
Recruiting
Tumor Necrosis Factor Decreases Vitamin D Dependant Calcium Absorption
Conditions:
Rheumatoid Arthritis;   Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Drug: calcitriol 
 
 

 
100
Recruiting
Transition Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Patients From Pediatric Gastroenterologist to Adult Gastroenterologist
Conditions:
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases;   Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Intervention:
Other: Transition program 
 
 

 
101
Recruiting
Post Marketing Surveillance of Remicade (Study P05224)
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Ankylosing Spondylitis 
Intervention:
Biological: Infliximab 
 
 

 
102
Not yet recruiting
The Effect of Infliximab on Sperm Quality
Conditions:
Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis 
Intervention:
Other: sperm quality test 
 
 

 
103
Recruiting
General Surgery Outcomes Database
Conditions:
Colon Cancer;   Diverticulitis;   Colorectal Polyps;   Crohn's Disease;   Ulcerative Colitis;   Rectal Cancer 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
104
Recruiting
The RATIO: Registry of Infections and Lymphoma in Patients Treated With TNF-a Antagonists
Conditions:
Rheumatoid Arthritis;   Crohn's Disease;   Ankylosing Spondylitis;   Psoriasis 
Intervention:
Drug: TNF-alpha antagonists 
 
 

 
105
Recruiting
Post Marketing Surveillance Study of Remicade in Patients With Chronic Inflammatory Diseases (Study P04840)
Conditions:
Arthritis, Rheumatoid;   Spondylitis, Ankylosing;   Arthritis, Psoriatic;   Psoriasis;   Crohn's Disease 
Intervention:
Biological: Infliximab 
 
 

 
106
Recruiting
Medical Treatment of Colitis in Patients With Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome
Conditions:
Hermanski-Pudlak Syndrome;   Colitis;   Cytokines;   Lymphocytes;   Drug Evaluation 
Interventions:
Drug: Mesalamine;   Drug: Infliximab;   Drug: Corticosteroids;   Drug: 6-Mercaptopurine;   Drug: Tacrolimus;   Drug: Adalimumab 
 
 

 
107
Recruiting
Inoculating Celiac Disease Patients With the Human Hookworm Necator Americanus: Evaluating Immunity and Gluten-Sensitivity
Condition:
Celiac Disease 
Interventions:
Biological: Necator americanus;   Other: Sham inoculation 
 
 

 
108
Recruiting
Use of Infliximab for the Treatment of Pemphigus Vulgaris
Condition:
Pemphigus 
Interventions:
Drug: Infliximab;   Drug: Prednisone;   Other: Placebo 
 
 

 
109
Recruiting
Random Comparison of LigaSure and Disposable Staples for Laparoscopic Surgery
Conditions:
Colonic Diseases;   Rectal Diseases 
Interventions:
Procedure: Bipolar electrosurgical generator and instruments;   Procedure: Disposable stapling instruments 
 
 

 
110
Recruiting
Open Label Study for Adults With Pyoderma Gangrenosum and Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Condition:
Pyoderma Gangrenosum 
Intervention:
Drug: Infliximab 
 
 

 
111
Not yet recruiting
Presence of IBD Specific Antibodies (ASCA, ALCA, ACCA, AMCA) in the Sera of Patients With Spondyloarthropathy
Conditions:
Psoriatic Arthritis;   Ankylosing Spondylitis;   Undifferentiated Spondyloarthropathy 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
112
Recruiting
Intravitreal Infliximab for Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) and Choroidal Neovascularization (CNV)
Conditions:
Diabetic Retinopathy;   Macular Degeneration 
Intervention:
Drug: intravitreal injection of infliximab 
 
 

 
113
Recruiting
Mechanistic Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) of Mesalazine in Symptomatic Diverticular Disease
Condition:
Diverticulosis, Colonic 
Interventions:
Device: Mesalazine;   Drug: Placebo 
 
 

 
114
Not yet recruiting
Saccharomyces Boulardii in Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Condition:
Diarrhea Dominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome 
Interventions:
Drug: Saccharomyces boulardii;   Drug: Placebo 
 
 

 
115
Recruiting
Surgical Decision Making Among People With Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Condition:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease 
Intervention:
 
 
 

 
116
Recruiting
Immunogenicity to Human Papillomavirus Vaccine (Gardasil) Among IBD Patients on Immunosuppressive Therapy
Condition:
Inflammatory Bowel Disease 
Intervention:
Biological: Gardasil vaccine 
 
 

 
117
Not yet recruiting
Manipulation of Visceral Sensitivity and Immune System in IBS
Condition:
Irritable Bowel Syndrome 
Intervention:
Drug: probiotic (bacterial/dietary supplement) 
 
 

 
118
Recruiting
Efficacy Study of Granulocytapheresis Plus Steroids vs Steroids Alone in Active Steroid Dependant Ulcerative Colitis
Condition:
Ulcerative Colitis 
Intervention:
Device: Granulocyte Monocyte Apheresis (GMA-Apheresis) 
 
 

 
119
Not yet recruiting
Synbiotic Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis Patients
Condition:
Ulcerative Colitis 
Intervention:
Other: Synbiotic (Synergy1/B. longum)